Carl H Smith

Carl H Smith

Carl H Smith is Director of the Learning Technology Research Centre (LTRC) and Principal Research Fellow at Ravensbourne. He has over with over 16 years experience conducting R+D into the application of hybrid technologies for perceptual and cognitive transformation. He is currently working on 4 EU projects including the Horizon 2020 project ‘[WEKIT] Wearable Experience for Knowledge Intensive Training’ which aims to create ‘Wearable Experience (WE)’ – an entirely new form of media. His other projects involve Context Engineering, Umwelt Hacking, Natural Media, Cyberdelics, Sensory Augmentation, Empathy Engines, Memory Palaces, Artificial Senses and Body Hacking.

Exploring Altered States of Consciousness Using Cyberdelics, Moistmedia & Mixed Reality Technologies.

We are exploring Cyberdelic technologies that allow us to create novel altered states of consciousness. The aim is not to try to replicate psychedelic effects themselves but instead provide an entirely new set of experiences. With the explosion of hybrid and perceptual technologies such as VR, AR and MR (Mixed Reality), we are extending the possible realities we can reach. The ability to alter our senses and design new senses provides us with a whole new tool-set for metaprogramming and self-transformation. We will review and discuss a range of perceptual technologies with the potential to expand our perception of ourselves and of the reality we live in. During the lecture the following subjects and questions will be explored: How adaptable is our perception? Can we hack the individual’s sense of self and relationship to the world? How can we develop and use these emerging mixed reality technologies to generate new forms of experience and induce non-ordinary states of consciousness? How can artificial senses be used to access a wider our perception of reality? Can we engineer non-dual awareness through technological interventions? How can we develop inter-species Umwelt hacking environments? How can we use Cyberdelics to break out of the prisons of our own perception? How can hybrid technological devices, of often-prosthetic alienation, help us to reconnect to ourselves and to the surrounding environment? Can sensory augmentation actually make us more human?