Henrik Jungaberle

Henrik Jungaberle

Dr. Henrik Jungaberle is a social scientist and health researcher focussing on psychoactive substances, psychedelic science and prevention. He is head and executive director of both the MIND Foundation and its mother organization FINDER an independet non-profit in Berlin. With others he founded the #DrugScience-international conference series. Henrik has conducted research about psychoactives in different fields of their application and developed the evidence-based life-skills and prevention programme REBOUND. He worked at the University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Medical Psychology, for 18 years and leas projects financed by the DFG (German Research Foundation) and EU-Commission (DPIP). Since 2015 he lives and works in Berlin.

“Positive psychology in the investigation of psychedelics – a systematic review and outlook on a 10-year-longitudinal study”

This talk presents the result of a systematic review of studies with psychedelics and entactogens as related to positive psychology. The later is about healthy human functioning, flourishing, wellbeing, happiness and eudaemonia – “the scientific study of what makes life most worth living”. The practice of using psychedelics (5-HT2A-receptor agonists,
serotonergic hallucinogens) like LSD or psilocybin as well as entactogens for other than strictly clinical reasons almost globally emerged in the course of the 20th century. In the review, we included 58 studies from neuroscience, epidemiology and psychotherapy research published before November 1st 2017. Psychedelics and entactogens were shown to produce both acute and long-term beneficial effects in clinical and in healthy populations. These include positive effects on well-being, introspection, prosocial behaviour, empathy, mindfulness, self-transcendence, creativity and personality factors like openness.  The results of this review call for (self-)critical epidemiological, therapeutic and laboratory research with non-pathological concepts in both the natural and social sciences –
and improved measures from positive psychology on effects in less biased populations with sound prospective longitudinal designs. In the conclusion a work-in-progress study design will be described that is planned to start in 2019 as a mixed-method 10-year-longitudinal project.